42 David Byrne Quotes ( Music Quotes).

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David Byrne (born 14 May 1952) is a Scottish-American singer, songwriter, record producer, actor, writer, music theorist, and filmmaker. He was a founding member and the principal songwriter, lead singer, and guitarist of the American new wave band Talking Heads.

Source – Wikipedia.

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42 David Byrne Quotes (Music Quotes):

1. I don’t care how impossible it seems.

2. With music, you often don’t have to translate it. It just affects you, and you don’t know why.

3. Sometimes it’s a form of love just to talk to somebody that you have nothing in common with and still be fascinated by their presence.

4. Facts are simple and facts are straight.
Facts are lazy and facts are late.
Facts all come with points of view.
Facts don’t do what I want them to.
Facts just twist the truth around.
Facts are living turned inside out.

5. I have trouble imagining what I could do that’s beyond the practicality of what I can do.

6. I like a good story and I also like staring at the sea– do I have to choose between the two?

7. Obviously, you go through a lot of emotional turmoil in a divorce.

8. Some folks believe that hardship breeds artistic creativity. I don’t buy it. One can put up with poverty for a while when one is young, but it will inevitably wear a person down.

9. The two biggest self-deceptions of all are that life has a ‘meaning’ and each of us is unique.

10. The better a singer’s voice, the harder it is to believe what they’re saying.

11. I do seem to like to combine the dramatic emotional warmth of strings with the grooves and body business of drums and bass.

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12. I love getting out of my comfort zone.

13. The true face of smoking is disease, death and horror – not the glamour and sophistication the pushers in the tobacco industry try to portray.

14. I sense the world might be more dreamlike, metaphorical, and poetic than we currently believe–but just as irrational as sympathetic magic when looked at in a typically scientific way. I wouldn’t be surprised if poetry–poetry in the broadest sense, in the sense of a world filled with metaphor, rhyme, and recurring patterns, shapes, and designs–is how the world works. The world isn’t logical, it’s a song.

15. Most of our lives aren’t that exciting, but the drama is still going on in the small details.

16. You may say to yourself: “Well, how did I get here?

17. For years we have been taught not to like things. Finally somebody said it was OK to like things. This was a great relief. It was getting hard to go around not liking everything.

18. Living “in” a story, being part of a narrative, is much more satisfying than living without one. I don’t always know what narrative it is, because I’m living my life and not always reflecting on it, but as I edit these pages I am aware that I have an urge to see my sometimes random wandering as having a plot, a purpose guided by some underlying story.

19. Do creative, social, and civic attitudes change depending on where we live? Yes, I think so.

20. The more you know, the more you know you don’t know and the more you know that you don’t know.

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21. Everything’s intentional. It’s just filling in the dots.

22. Creative work is more accurately a machine that digs down and finds stuff, emotional stuff that will someday be raw material that can be used to produce more stuff, stuff like itself – clay to be available for future use.

23. I didn’t have any agenda or plan when I started writing stuff.

24. The act of making music, clothes, art, or even food has a very different, and possibly more beneficial effect on us than simply consuming those things. And yet for a very long time, the attitude of the state toward teaching and funding the arts has been in direct opposition to fostering creativity among the general population. It can often seem that those in power don’t want us to enjoy making things for ourselves—they’d prefer to establish a cultural hierarchy that devalues our amateur efforts and encourages consumption rather than creation. This might sound like I believe there is some vast conspiracy at work, which I don’t, but the situation we find ourselves in is effectively the same as if there were one. The way we are taught about music, and the way it’s socially and economically positioned, affect whether it’s integrated (or not) into our lives, and even what kind of music might come into existence in the future. Capitalism tends toward the creation of passive consumers, and in many ways this tendency is counterproductive.

25. Language as a Prison

26. Yeah, anybody can go in with two turntables and a microphone or a home studio sampler and a little cassette deck or whatever and make records in their bedrooms.

27. Music resonates in so many parts of the brain that we can’t conceive of it being an isolated thing. It’s whom you were with, how old you were, and what was happening that day.

28. You can know or not know how a car runs and still enjoy riding in a car.

29. As music becomes less of a thing–a cylinder, a cassette, a disc–and more ephemeral, perhaps we will begin to assign an increasing value to live performances again.

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30. Life tends to be an accumulation of a lot of mundane decisions, which often gets ignored.

31. Cycling can be lonely, but in a good way. It gives you a moment to breathe and think, and get away from what you’re working on.

32. But at times words can be a dangerous addition to music — they can pin it down. Words imply that the music is about what the words say, literally, and nothing more. If done poorly, they can destroy the pleasant ambiguity that constitutes much of the reason we love music. That ambiguity allows listeners to psychologically tailor a song to suit their needs, sensibilities, and situations, but words can limit that, too. There are plenty of beautiful tracks that I can’t listen to because they’ve been “ruined” by bad words — my own and others. In Beyonce’s song “Irreplaceable,” she rhymes “minute” with “minute,” and I cringe every time I hear it (partly because by that point I’m singing along). On my own song “Astronaut,” I wrap up with the line “feel like I’m an astronaut,” which seems like the dumbest metaphor for alienation ever. Ugh.

33. I’m afraid that reason will triumph and that the world will become a place where anyone who doesn’t fit that will become unnecessary.

34. The arts don’t exist in isolation.

35. When everything is visible and appears to be dumb, that’s when the details take on larger meanings.

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36. There’s something about music that encourages people to want to know more about the person that made it, and where it was recorded, what year it was done, what they were listening to, and all this kind of stuff. There’s something that invites all this obsessive behavior.

37. Forces that you might think are utterly unrelated to creativity can have a big impact. Technology, obviously, but environment, too. Even financial structures can affect the actual content of a song. The making of music is profoundly affected by the market.

38. Probably the reason it’s a little hard to break away from the album format completely is, if you’re getting a band together in the studio, it makes financial sense to do more than one song at a time. And it makes more sense, if you’re going to all the effort of performing and doing whatever else, if there’s a kind of bundle.

39. We don’t make music – it makes us.

40. To some extent I happily don’t know what I’m doing. I feel that it’s an artist’s responsibility to trust that.

41. I’m guarded; I don’t talk much.

42. In a certain way, it’s the sound of the words, the inflection and the way the song is sung and the way it fits the melody and the way the syllables are on the tongue that has as much of the meaning as the actual, literal words.

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